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Poker strategies

Gamblergbr

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is it better to bluff amatures that only call with great hands and play tight against good players that know how to bluff or is it better the other way around just in general I know it depends on many situations i am just asking in general
 

PokerKing

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1. Do not try to bluff a fish, because as Dan Negruni (I know spelling is wrong) how can you bluff a fish to make them think you have a strong hand when they do not even know what they have. Play tight against them. One thing I noticed about some fish is that they will raise when they are bluffing, but just call when they are lucky enough to get the nuts.

2. Maniacs-if you try to bluff them try to do it only when you have position. Many times if they are re raised they will fold, but will re raise with any two cards if they have position.
 

poker-poker

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You never want to bluff a beginner because they have no idea what is going on and what you are representing. You do not want to bluff a calling station or a sheriff, as they may or may not call for their entire stack with ace high.

You want to bluff the regular rocks, who only call with big hands. So if they call, you know what to do next.
 

KevinLush

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I would shy away from bluffing very much at the amateur tables. That is where it is VERY HARD to know what you are playing against. If its a cheaper table and they are amateurs I see people calling all-in preflop raises with 7 10 offsuit. Scary part is when they win.

Those are the tables to start on but bluffing too much is definitely a bad thing there.

Kevin Lush
 

BgFutbol

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I have to agree, playing against uneducated player is hard too, sometimes its easier to predict what a pro thinks. The beginners are just playing different than the rest of the people.
 

mindstorm

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Yesterday at SnG i played against a maniac (lol), he was very aggressive, but very lucky (fish luck?), he managed to trow 4 guys off the table. How do u think what's the best tactics playing against guys like this one.
 

jasminejones

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The best lesson you can have on how to properly bluff is to simply go out and try it yourself. Everyone has to learn the hard way eventually, no matter how much you read on poker strategies . The key is to learn from your mistakes on how aggressive you can be and then tone it down to match the style of the table. Most important though, is to actually try and bluff. Being nervous or scared is a very natural thing and getting over that emotional block is an important part of controlling your nerves and mindset to make good plays.
 

markcasino

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Poker sharks are commonly described as tight and aggressive: "These poker pros do not play many hands, but when they play them, they play them like they have the nuts."

That's a nice general description, but it doesn't say much. In my opinion, a solid poker player is one who has mastered the four key skills of poker.

Skill #1: Mathematics

• A solid poker player knows the general probabilities of the game. For example, they know that you have about 1 in 8.5 chance of hitting a set when holding a pocket pair, and that you have about a 1 in 3 chance of completing a flopped flush draw by the river.



• Good players understand the importance of outs. Outs are simply the number of cards that will improve your hand. Count your outs, multiply them by two, and add one, and that's roughly the percentage shot you have at hitting.

• Good players can figure out the pot odds. Knowing outs is meaningless unless it's translated into rational, calculated betting. Knowing you have a 20% chance of hitting, what do you do then? If you're not sure, check out our Pot Odds article.

• Math skills are the most basic knowledge; it's day-one reading. Anyone who doesn't understand these concepts should not play in a game for real money until they do.

Skill #2: Discipline

• Good poker players demand an advantage. What separates a winning poker player from a fish is that a fish does not expect to win, while a poker player does. A fish is happy playing craps, roulette, or the slots; he just hopes to get lucky. A poker player does not hope to get lucky. He just hopes others don't get lucky.

• Good poker players understand that a different game requires a different discipline. A disciplined no-limit player can be a foolish limit player and vice versa. For example, a disciplined limit hold'em player has solid preflop skills. When there is not much action preflop, he or she only plays the better hands. When a lot of people are limping in, he or she will make a loose call with a suited connector or other speculative hand.

• A disciplined player knows when to play and when to quit. He recognizes when he is on tilt and is aware when a game is too juicy to just quit while ahead.

• A disciplined player knows that he is not perfect. When a disciplined player makes a mistake, he learns. He does not blame others. He does not cry. He learns from the mistake and moves on.

Skill #3: Psychology

• A good player is not a self-centered player. He may be the biggest SOB you know. He may not care about anyone but himself, and he may enjoy stealing food from the poor. However, when a poker pro walks into a poker room, he always empathizes with his opponents. He tries to think what they think and understand the decisions they make and why they make them. The poker pro always tries to have an answer to these questions:

1. What does my opponent have?
2. What does my opponent think I have?
3. What does my opponent think I think he has?

• Knowing the answer to these questions is the first step, manipulating the answers is the second and more important step. Suppose that you have a pair of kings and your opponent has a pair of aces. If you both know what the other has, and you both know that you know what the other has, then why play a game of poker? A poker pro manipulates the answers to questions #2 and #3 by slowplaying, fastplaying, and bluffing in order to throw his opponent off.

• Good poker players know that psychology is much more important in a no-limit game than in a limit game. Limit games often turn into math battles, while no-limit games carry a strong psychology component. Thus, poker tells are much more important in no-limit games.

Skill #4: Understanding Risk vs. Reward

• Pot odds and demanding an advantage fall into this category. Poker players are willing to take a long-shot risk if the reward is high enough, but only if the expected return is higher than the risk.

• More importantly, they understand the risk vs. reward nature of the game outside of the actual poker room. They know how much bank they need to play, and how much money they need in reserve to cover other expenses in life.

• Good poker players understand they need to be more risk-averse with their overall bankroll than their stack at the table.

When you play in an individual game, you must value every chip equally at the table. You should only care about making correct plays. If you buy in for $10, you should be okay with taking a 52% chance of doubling up to $20 if it means a 48% chance of losing your $10.

However, you should be risk-averse with your overall bankroll. You need to have enough money so that any day at the tables will not affect your bankroll too much. If you worry too much about losing, then you will make mistakes at the table. You need to leave yourself with the chance to fight another day.
 

jasjasika

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Poker is a popular card game that combines elements of chance and strategy. There are various styles of Poker, all of which share an objective of presenting the least probable or highest-scoring hand. A poker hand is a configuration of five cards, either held entirely by a player or drawn partly from a number of shared, community cards. Players bet on their hands in a number of rounds as cards are drawn, employing various mathematical and intutitive strategies in an attempt to better opponents.
 

Naeem007

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hello guys ...

its really nice and informative post....

i just liked it....

thanks for your information guys ...........
 

gamerbud

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Jacoby said:
Do any of these strategies really work?!?
of course those strategies works... they just shared based on what they've experienced.
thought, strategies are useless if you don't know how to use it.
 

Mathieu002

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In my opinion, it's everyone benefit if we spend time learning about poker strategies and things. You can play the game more when you have the knowledge and the know-how to play poker properly.
 

Mathieu002

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You will discover that knowing some online poker strategy will be of great help to you. However, it's also to your benefit if you spend more time playing the game of poker.
 

LonnieDunn

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These strategies might be useful. However, the best way to improve your skills is by some simple practice.
 
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